Level 4 – Production Engineering for Manufacture

Unit 14              

Unit code                                H/615/1488

Unit level                               4

Credit value                           15

 

Introduction 

All of the manufactured products we use in our daily lives, from processed food to clothing and cars, are the result of production engineering. Production engineers need to have a comprehensive knowledge and understanding of all the possible production technologies available, their advantages and disadvantages, the requirements of the production system operation and the interaction between the various components of the production system.

This unit introduces students to the production process for key material types; the various types of machinery used to manufacture products and the different ways of organising production systems to optimise the production process; consideration of how to measure the effectiveness of a production system within the overall context of the manufacturing system; and an examination of how production engineering contributes to ensuring safe and reliable operation of manufacturing.

On successful completion of this unit students will be able to illustrate the role and purpose of production engineering and its relationship with the other elements of a manufacturing system. They will be able to select the most appropriate production processes and associated facility arrangements for manufacturing products of different material types and design a production system incorporating a number of different production processes.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this unit students will be able to:

  1. Illustrate the role and purpose of production engineering and its relationship with the other elements of a manufacturing
  2. Select the most appropriate production processes and associated facility arrangements, for manufacturing products of different material
  3. Analyse how a production system can incorporate a number of different production processes for a given product or
  4. Explore the effectiveness of a production system in terms of its operation within the wider manufacturing

Essential Content

LO1 Illustrate the role and purpose of production engineering and its relationship with the other elements of a manufacturing system

Production engineering activities:

Common practices for manufacturing

Research and develop tools, processes, machines, and equipment Integrate facilities and systems for producing quality products

Design, implement and refine products, services, processes and systems Combination of manufacturing technology and management science

LO2 Select the most appropriate production processes and associated facility arrangements, for manufacturing products of different material types

Production processes:

Common ceramics, composite, metals manufacturing processes

Bonding and jointing technologies, including welding, adhesives, snap fits, interference fits and mechanical assemblies

LO3 Analyse how a production system can incorporate a number of different production processes for a given product or assembly 

Function of the range of production facilities within a manufacturing plant:

Production design for manufacture and assembly Cellular and flexible manufacturing systems

Component production using CNC machining centres and automated production processes

Automated materials handling equipment, conveyor systems, automatic guided vehicle servicing, product assembly and production lines

Heat treatment facilities, paint and coating plants Warehouse, stock storage equipment

The purpose, operation and effects of incorporating concepts such as lean manufacturing and just-in-time (JIT) supply to the production process

LO4 Explore the effectiveness of a production system in terms of its operation within the wider manufacturing system

Production systems:

Production performance criteria, through-put rates, yield rates, cost effectiveness, sustainability, flexibility and reliability

Optimising supply chain performance and management

Essential collaboration between manufacturer, supplier and retailer

Production errors and rectification:

Cost in terms of time, material waste, product recall, reputation and litigation Production data collection, critical evaluation and analysis

The human component:

Cultural openness to new ideas and continuous improvement Collaboration and information sharing

Performance management and rewards Engineer training and development practices